1. Herzlich willkommen bei WPDE.org, dem grössten und ältesten deutschsprachigen Community-Forum rund um das Thema WordPress. Du musst angemeldet oder registriert sein, um Beiträge verfassen zu können.
    Information ausblenden

Softwarepatente & warum wir was dagegen unternehmen soll

Dieses Thema im Forum "Allgemeines" wurde erstellt von TigerDE2, 3. Juli 2005.

Status des Themas:
Es sind keine weiteren Antworten möglich.
  1. TigerDE2

    TigerDE2 Well-Known Member

    Registriert seit:
    9. September 2004
    Beiträge:
    1.137
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    Wir hier bei WordPress.de sind alle keine Experten, wenn es ums Thema Softwarepatente geht. Aber auch wir sind auf die Debatte aufmerksam geworden und spätestens, seit wir untenstehenden Artikel gefunden haben - den wir euch natürlich nicht vorenthalten wollen - haben wir beschlossen, etwas zu tun.

    Wie ihr sicherlich schon auf der Startseite gesehen habt, bleiben weniger als drei Tage Zeit, um zu handeln. Jeder von euch muss wissen, wie ihr zum Patentrecht auf Software steht, aber ich persönlich sehe WordPress in Gefahr und will deswegen meinen Europaabgeordneten (de|at|eu) kontaktieren - via Fax. Briefe sind in Anbetracht der viel zu kurz bemessenen Zeit zu langsam, E-Mails zu einfach zu löschen, und es dürfte fast unmöglich sein, einen MEP ans Telefon zu kriegen.

    Im Übrigen möchte ich noch ausdrücklich feststellen, dass dashier keine offizielle WordPress.org-Aktion ist - wir haben als deutsche Communitybetreiber beschlossen, uns an euch - die Nutzer - zu wenden. Bitte beachtet das in Eurer Berichterstattung, wenn ihr darüber bloggt: Wir sind das inoffizielle WordPress Deutschland... :)

    Hier also der Artikel von The Guardian:
    ___________________________________________________________________

    Patent absurdity

    If patent law had been applied to novels in the 1880s, great books would not have been written. If the EU applies it to software, every computer user will be restricted, says Richard Stallman

    Richard Stallman
    Monday June 20, 2005
    Guardian Unlimited


    Next month, the European Parliament will vote on the vital question of whether to allow patents covering software, which would restrict every computer user and tie software developers up in knots.

    Many politicians may be voting blindly - not being programmers, they don't understand what software patents do. They often think patents are similar to copyright law (except for some details), which is not the case.

    For example, when I publicly asked Patrick Devedjian, then the minister for industry, how France would vote on the issue of software patents, he responded with an impassioned defence of copyright law, praising Victor Hugo for his role in the adoption of copyright.

    Those who imagine effects like those of copyright law cannot grasp the real effects of software patents. We can use Hugo as an example to illustrate the difference between the two.

    A novel and a modern complex programme have certain points in common: each is large and implements many ideas. Suppose patent law had been applied to novels in the 1800s; suppose states such as France had permitted the patenting of literary ideas. How would this have affected Hugo's writing? How would the effects of literary patents compare with the effects of literary copyright?

    Consider the novel Les Misérables, written by Hugo. Because he wrote it, the copyright belonged only to him. He did not have to fear that some stranger could sue him for copyright infringement and win. That was impossible, because copyright covers only the details of a work of authorship, and only restricts copying. Hugo had not copied Les Misérables, so he was not in danger.

    Patents work differently. They cover ideas - each patent is a monopoly on practising some idea, which is described in the patent itself.

    Here's one example of a hypothetical literary patent:

    Claim 1: a communication process that represents, in the mind of a reader, the concept of a character who has been in jail for a long time and becomes bitter towards society and humankind.

    Claim 2: a communication process according to claim 1, wherein said character subsequently finds moral redemption through the kindness of another.

    Claim 3: a communication process according to claims 1 and 2, wherein said character changes his name during the story.

    If such a patent had existed in 1862 when Les Misérables was published, the novel would have infringed all three claims - all these things happened to Jean Valjean in the novel. Hugo could have been sued, and would have lost. The novel could have been prohibited - in effect, censored - by the patent holder.

    Now consider this hypothetical literary patent:

    Claim 1: a communication process that represents, in the mind of a reader, the concept of a character who has been in jail for a long time and subsequently changes his name.

    Les Misérables would have infringed that patent too, because it also fits the life story of Jean Valjean.

    These patents would all cover the story of one character in a novel. They overlap, but they do not precisely duplicate each other, so they could all be valid simultaneously - all the patent holders could have sued Victor Hugo. Any one of them could have prohibited publication of Les Misérables.

    You might think these ideas are so simple that no patent office would have issued them. We programmers are often amazed by the simplicity of the ideas that real software patents cover - for instance, the European Patent Office has issued a patent on the progress bar, and one on accepting payment via credit cards. These would be laughable if they were not so dangerous.

    Other aspects of Les Misérables could also have fallen foul of patents. For instance, there could have been a patent on a fictionalised portrayal of the Battle of Waterloo, or a patent on using Parisian slang in fiction. Two more lawsuits.

    In fact, there is no limit to the number of different patents that might have been applicable for suing the author of a work like Les Misérables. All the patent holders would claim they deserved a reward for the literary progress that their patented ideas represented - but these obstacles would not promote progress in literature. They would only obstruct it.

    However, a very broad patent could have made all these issues irrelevant. Imagine patents with broad claims, like these:

    Communication process structured with narration that continues through many pages.

    A narration structure sometimes resembling a fugue or improvisation.

    Intrigue articulated around the confrontation of specific characters, each in turn setting traps for the others.

    Who would the patent holders have been? They could have been other novelists, perhaps Dumas or Balzac, who had written such novels - but not necessarily.

    It isn't necessary to write a programme to patent a software idea, so if our hypothetical literary patents follow the real patent system, these patent holders would not have had to write novels, or stories, or anything - except patent applications.

    Patent parasite companies - businesses that produce nothing except threats and lawsuits - are growing larger.

    Given these broad patents, Hugo would not have reached the point of asking what patents might get him sued for using the character of Jean Valjean. He could not even have considered writing a novel of this kind.

    This analogy can help non-programmers to see what software patents do. Software patents cover features, such as defining abbreviations in a word processor or natural order recalculation in a spreadsheet.

    They cover algorithms that programmes need to use. They cover aspects of file formats, such as Microsoft's new formats for Word files. The MPEG 2 video format is covered by 39 different US patents.

    Just as one novel could infringe many different literary patents at once, one programme can infringe many different patents at once. It is so much work to identify all the patents infringed by a large programme that only one such study has been done.

    A 2004 study of Linux, the kernel of the GNU/Linux operating system, found that it infringed 283 different US software patents. That means each of these 283 different patents covers a computational process found somewhere in the thousands of pages of source code of Linux.

    The text of the directive approved by the council of ministers clearly authorises patents covering software techniques.

    Its backers claim the requirement for patents to have a "technical character" will exclude software patents - but it will not. It is easy to describe a computer programme in a "technical" way, the boards of appeal of the European Patent Office said.

    The board is aware that its comparatively broad interpretation of the term "invention" in Article 52 (1) EPC will include activities so familiar that their technical character tends to be overlooked, such as the act of writing using pen and paper.

    Any usable software can be "loaded and executed in a computer, programmed computer network or other programmable apparatus" in order to do its job, which is the criterion in article 5 (2) of the directive for patents to prohibit even the publication of programmes.

    The way to prevent software patents from bollixing software development is simple: don't authorise them. In the first reading, in 2003, the European parliament adopted the necessary amendments to exclude software patents, but the council of ministers reversed the decision.

    Citizens of the EU should phone their MEPs without delay, urging them to sustain the parliament's previous decision in the second reading of the directive.

    © 2005 Richard Stallman (rms@gnu.org). Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article are permitted worldwide without royalty in any medium provided this notice is preserved.

    · Richard Stallman launched the GNU operating system (www.gnu.org) in 1984 and founded the Free Software Foundation (fsf.org) in 1985. Gérald Sédrati-Dinet devised the examples in this article
    __________________________________________________________________
    Was du jetzt tun kannst:
    Sende ein Fax an deinen Abgeordneten | Unterzeichne die Petition | Unerstütze den FFII | Informiere dich weiter: (1) (2) (3)
    Und wenn du Montag und Dienstag noch nichts vor hast:
    Geh' demonstrieren
     
  2. Olaf

    Olaf WPDE-Team
    Mitarbeiter

    Registriert seit:
    3. September 2004
    Beiträge:
    2.738
    Zustimmungen:
    29
    NoSoftwarePatents.com - Wir wollen keine Softwarepatente!
    Hier erfahrt ihr worum es geht, welche Gefahren drohen und was man tun kann.

    Förderverein für eine Freie Informationelle Infrastruktur e.V. hat kostenlose Bustransfers nach Straßburg organisiert.

    Warum die Aufregung um Softwarepatente?
    Ein Patent ist ein Recht, eine Erfindung zu monopolisieren. Ein angehender Erfinder gibt einen Bereich von Aktionen an, von denen er andere ausschließen möchte (die Ansprüche), und reicht diesen beim Patentamt ein, welches dann untersucht, ob diese Ansprüche eine Erfindung im Sinne des Gesetzes beschreiben und ob diese Erfindung ordnungsgemäß offengelegt und industriell anwandbar ist (formale Prüfung). Einige Patentämter untersuchen darüber hinaus, ob die Erfindung neu und nicht offensichtlich ist (materielle Prüfung). Wenn der Antrag die Hürden der Prüfung überstanden hat, erteilt das Patentamt dem Antragssteller für eine Periode von 20 Jahren die exklusiven Produktions- und Vermarktungsrechte für diese Erfindung.

    Programmieren lässt sich mit dem Schreiben einer Symphonie vergleichen. Wenn ein Programmierer Software schreibt, verknüpft er tausende von Ideen (Algorithmen oder Rechenregeln) zu einem urheberrechtlich geschütztem Werk. Normalerweise werden einige dieser Ideen in der Arbeit des Programmierers nach den (von Natur aus niedrigen) Standards des Patent-Systems neu und nicht-offensichtich sein. Wenn viele solcher Ideen patentiert sind, wird es unmöglich, Software zu schreiben, ohne Patente zu verletzen. Software-Autoren werden dadurch im Endeffekt ihres urheberrechtlich geschützten, geistigen Eigentums beraubt; sie leben unter der permanenten Bedrohung, von Besitzern großer Patent-Portfolios erpresst zu werden. Infolge dessen wird weniger Software geschrieben und weniger neue Ideen kommen auf.

    (Quelle: Softwarepatente in Europa: Ein kurzer Überblick)
     
  3. ma-re

    ma-re Well-Known Member

    Registriert seit:
    22. Mai 2005
    Beiträge:
    61
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    Ich schließe mich und meinen Webspace der Demo an und wünsche Viel Erfolg.
     
  4. \0

    \0 Well-Known Member

    Registriert seit:
    13. Mai 2005
    Beiträge:
    1.569
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    gefunden bei heise: http://www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/61446
    hip hip....
     
  5. nebelschwade

    nebelschwade Well-Known Member

    Registriert seit:
    21. Februar 2005
    Beiträge:
    61
    Zustimmungen:
    0
  6. TigerDE2

    TigerDE2 Well-Known Member

    Registriert seit:
    9. September 2004
    Beiträge:
    1.137
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    Gott sei Dank! :)
    Es lebe die Demokratie! :mrgreen:
     
  7. Marius

    Marius Well-Known Member

    Registriert seit:
    30. Mai 2005
    Beiträge:
    50
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    HIPHIP HURRRRRA!!!!
     
  8. Monika

    Monika Well-Known Member
    Ehrenmitglied

    Registriert seit:
    4. Juni 2005
    Beiträge:
    14.126
    Zustimmungen:
    2
    ich bin völlig geschockt

    mein Weltbild hat einen Knacks...

    die in Brüssel denken (mit)


    :D :D :D
    Monika
     
  9. TigerDE2

    TigerDE2 Well-Known Member

    Registriert seit:
    9. September 2004
    Beiträge:
    1.137
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    Hähm, die im Parlament sind eigentlich der Grund, das in Deutschland noch sinnvolle Gesetze gemacht werden und nicht alles auf Stillstand steht. Das kommt in den Medien nur leider nie so ganz rüber... ;)
     
Status des Themas:
Es sind keine weiteren Antworten möglich.
  1. Diese Seite verwendet Cookies, um Inhalte zu personalisieren, diese deiner Erfahrung anzupassen und dich nach der Registrierung angemeldet zu halten.
    Wenn du dich weiterhin auf dieser Seite aufhältst, akzeptierst du unseren Einsatz von Cookies.
    Information ausblenden
  1. Diese Seite verwendet Cookies, um Inhalte zu personalisieren, diese deiner Erfahrung anzupassen und dich nach der Registrierung angemeldet zu halten.
    Wenn du dich weiterhin auf dieser Seite aufhältst, akzeptierst du unseren Einsatz von Cookies.
    Information ausblenden